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Protecting Residents In Your HOA With Dementia
Posted on February 17, 2016 8:30 AM by HOA Sites
Categories: HOA Website
Residents of all ages should be protected in the homeowners association and that includes those who are retired or nearing retirement.  Through the community website, homeowners have the opportunity to connect with one another.  Often, most of us look forward to the future without considering the complications associated with the aging process.
 
Each year, more than 5 million Americans suffer from dementia where brain cells are damaged, commonly caused by Alzheimer’s disease.  Usually, symptoms start with a decline in memory and progress to complications that interfere with day to day functions.  Can you counteract this from happening to you?
 
What You Can Do Now
 
Unfortunately, one of the risk factors for dementia is genetics and that is unchangeable but there are some lifestyle choices you can make that work to your benefit.  Obviously, avoid smoking and drinking alcohol but exercise your brain as well as your body, especially if there’s a family history of the illness.  You are more at risk when a relative has the disease.
 
Staying active is one way towards prevention as the disease is caused when brain cells are damaged.  Regular exercise can lower the risk of dementia as exercise increases oxygen and blood flow to the brain.  Studies actually show a link between the risk of Alzheimer’s developing and conditions that damage the heart and blood vessels such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol.
 
Recognize Dementia
 
In a homeowners association, it is important that other neighbors be informed about a fellow resident having dementia.  If they see the person walking around disoriented or confused, they can contact a family member or enact an emergency plan to keep the resident safe.  Watch for symptoms such as agitation, anger, anxiety, and wandering as many with dementia tend to wander around.  If you notice this, use the community website to get in contact with a board member and apprise them of the situation.
9761 Crosspoint Blvd
 Suite 400
 Indianapolis, IN 46256
Phone: 317.608.6533